Threads of Tradition / Weavings are Deep in Texture and Significance

Threads of Tradition / Weavings are Deep in Texture and Significance

Threads of Tradition/Weavings are Deep in Texture and Significance
Ament, Deloris Tarzan
Seattle Times, January 12, 1992


These articles discuss Timothy Manring and his wife, Indrastuti Hadiputranto,
who donated 500 Indonesian ikat textiles to the Seattle Art Museum. The couple has
collected Indonesian textiles since 1970. At the time of the article, they said that a 2 ½
meter sarong-length batik by a famous maker such as Javanese artist Oey Soe Tjoen
could cost $1,000, gold-leafed batiks $5,000, and good silk batiks $80-$200 each. “Still,
in one of those ironies that abound in the world of art, batik makers may earn as little as $3 a day.” Prices for fine ikats are harder to predict, because there are no standard
dimensions. The Manrings noted that originally they had intended to give SAM examples
of both ikats and batiks, but found that the museum was interested only in ikats. Ament
notes that “Indonesia’s exquisite batiks, tapestry weavings, and shell embroidery all win
worldwide admiration. But no textile exceeds ikat in complexity and pure artistic power.”
The article discusses that the fineness of an ikat depends on how many threads are
bunched for tying. In ordinary ikats, 10 to 15 threads are bunched; in the finest weavings, as few as three may compose a bundle.”


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